Kitchen Stool For Toddlers

Kitchen Stool For Toddlers

So clearly, we embrace his presence in the kitchen. To that end, he usually uses either a step-stool or a chair to do his work. Unfortunately, the stool is too short, the chair is too tall, and neither of them proves to be conducive to longer cooking sessions. So I set out to design a kids step-stool that includes features like safety elements, height adjustability, custom-sizing for kitchen countertops, and a nice wide platform. I looked around at some of the commercial designs for inspiration and really didn’t like what I saw. Most of them were fairly unattractive plywood structures that looked more at home in a Gymboree than in a kitchen. Since we have to look at this thing every day, I decided it must also be attractive. So a stylish appearance was the final feature I included. The end result is the Kids Kitchen Step Stool with some Arts & Crafts flair.
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Kitchen Stool For Toddlers

Since it’s the holiday season, the Kids Kitchen Step Stool has seen a lot of use already. It does exactly what it’s supposed to do, giving our son a comfortable place to hang out while actively participating in kitchen activities. I should note that he’s actually more attentive and has more patience while he’s using the step stool. Something about it makes his experience more of a learning “event” rather than simply helping mom or dad. He still uses a regular step stool to get water and do other small tasks, but when it’s time to cook with mom he’s all about his Kids Kitchen Step Stool.
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Kitchen Stool For Toddlers

The Kids Kitchen Step Stool is an asset to any family with kids! One of Nicole’s favorite things to do with our son is cook. At this stage, it’s mostly measuring ingredients and stirring but we’ll soon move on to cutting vegetables and other fun culinary tasks. And while many adults look at cooking as a chore, kids see it a compelling and fun way to be useful. Not only that, but our son is a very picky eater. We find that making him a part of the cooking process makes it much easier for him to try new foods.
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Kitchen Stool For Toddlers

Description: I used to get up every morning and make breakfast with my toddler hanging on my legs, begging to be picked up. No more, ever since we hacked a BEKVÄM stool to make a DIY learning tower for her. Now, my toddler can reach the kitchen counter and cook alongside us.
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Kitchen Stool For Toddlers

Scott April 26, 2016 5:14 pm Marc, I can’t wait for my girls to use this stool. I am currently making one for them and my nephew. However, I have an item holding me up. I do not have the tools to create the holes for the dominos, so I have opted to use pegs for the entire project. Would a 5/16″ x 1-1/2″ peg be sufficient in lieu of the dominos? I have read in previous comments that you would recommend a 1/4″ peg at the step rails, but what about the rest of the areas? Would I need to increase the amount of pegs I use? Thank you- Scott Reply
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Kitchen Stool For Toddlers

Marc, I can’t wait for my girls to use this stool. I am currently making one for them and my nephew. However, I have an item holding me up. I do not have the tools to create the holes for the dominos, so I have opted to use pegs for the entire project. Would a 5/16″ x 1-1/2″ peg be sufficient in lieu of the dominos? I have read in previous comments that you would recommend a 1/4″ peg at the step rails, but what about the rest of the areas? Would I need to increase the amount of pegs I use? Thank you- Scott
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Kitchen Stool For Toddlers

Yes Sir. I understand the concern of eyesore. If, however, you were to cross-drill and then tap, for the same 1/4-20 bolts in your design, a 1/2″ brass rod, the rod can then be inserted from beneath the rails, completely out of sight. Then, since tightening the screw will result in compressing wood fibers to tighten the joint rather than pulling on a threaded insert, the stool will be stronger and safer with no change in the original appearance.
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Kitchen Stool For Toddlers

I can’t wait for my girls to use this stool. I am currently making one for them and my nephew. However, I have an item holding me up. I do not have the tools to create the holes for the dominos, so I have opted to use pegs for the entire project. Would a 5/16″ x 1-1/2″ peg be sufficient in lieu of the dominos? I have read in previous comments that you would recommend a 1/4″ peg at the step rails, but what about the rest of the areas? Would I need to increase the amount of pegs I use?
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Rich December 16, 2014 8:00 pm Yes Sir. I understand the concern of eyesore. If, however, you were to cross-drill and then tap, for the same 1/4-20 bolts in your design, a 1/2″ brass rod, the rod can then be inserted from beneath the rails, completely out of sight. Then, since tightening the screw will result in compressing wood fibers to tighten the joint rather than pulling on a threaded insert, the stool will be stronger and safer with no change in the original appearance. Reply
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First, we removed the top off the stool and attached four posts to it. And then we added the six side panels (see photos) and a dowel in the back to prevent her from falling out. The whole thing took us only an hour or so! We got all the wood cut by a worker at a home improvement store, so that helped. Last but not least, we gave it a coat of yellow spray paint and then it was ready to be used by an active toddler! More photos and instructions, including measurements, can be found at my blog.
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Jeff Horne November 15, 2015 9:45 pm Hi Mark, Thanks for the great YouTube video and the Sketchup plan that guided me through the process of building the kitchen helper. You’re a real pro! I should mention that on the Sketchup SKP the 3/4×1 inch cleats are shown oriented at 90 degrees to what you show on the video. Threw me a loop for a while. Otherwise, everything went well. I modified your great design slightly because I have access to Maple hardwood flooring that I plane one side to 11/16″ and cut to 3″ wide max. Still looks great! A company that installs wood floors gives me their left over wood from an installation that would probably go to the landfill. Just had to recycle. Thanks again Reply
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Hi Mark, Thanks for the great YouTube video and the Sketchup plan that guided me through the process of building the kitchen helper. You’re a real pro! I should mention that on the Sketchup SKP the 3/4×1 inch cleats are shown oriented at 90 degrees to what you show on the video. Threw me a loop for a while. Otherwise, everything went well. I modified your great design slightly because I have access to Maple hardwood flooring that I plane one side to 11/16″ and cut to 3″ wide max. Still looks great! A company that installs wood floors gives me their left over wood from an installation that would probably go to the landfill. Just had to recycle. Thanks again
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I could not call this one the kitchen helper because I get help with everything from building and painting furniture, to doing laundry, to hanging pictures.  It’s a helping tower.
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My mother-in-law once told me a story about kids in a playground on a busy interstate highway.  At recess, the kids would play outside, running after balls, laughing freely and oblivious to the traffic.  But then one day, the fence around the playground came down and suddenly, the children were very aware of the traffic, and huddled in a circle in the center of the playground. It might be work for me, but whatever I’m up to is my daughter’s playground.  And today, she got a security fence. I could not call this one the kitchen helper because I get help with everything from building and painting furniture, to doing laundry, to hanging pictures.  It’s a helping tower. This one really shouldn’t have taken me a year to design.  In fact when I started working on the design this very afternoon, I had no clue it would be done by that evening.  But the truth is, I’ve been thinking about this design for a very very long time.  how can I make it easy to build?  Lightweight?  Easily adjustable?  Tip resistant?  Cheap?  Conserve materials? I’ve been working on this one for much longer than a few hours.  And I’m so glad.  Because I couldn’t be happier with the design.  It’s easy to build.  It uses standard boards, so no tedious jigsaw cutting of plywood or wasted plywood pieces.  It’s lightweight and more compact than it appears.  It’s inexpensive to build (under $20 category without paint).  But I love most the adjustable platform.  The platform adjust so easily but securely! And . . . after so many of you requested . . . an easy way to make the Little Helper Tower store under beds or in hallways.  The Little Helper Tower can easily fold flat. Like 3″ flat, under bed flat, in the garage flat, in no time flat. And in no time flat, fold open again. The platform keeps the Little Helper Tower from collapsing when in place.  Some notes about making yours fold:  It’s always more sturdy to have a glued and screwed joint than a hinged one.  I highly recommend building yours fixed if you can (mine gets use all day, from making cookies to making forts), but if folding is a must, then use a total of 8 hinge sets (photos show only 4 sets because that’s all I had on hand) and periodically check to make sure hinges are tight.  Also, when you construct the platform, leave just 3/4″ space between the end and the supports to get a super tight fit on the platform.  See the final step for specific instructions on folding. The platform adjusters are actually a ladder to get your youngster to climb into it, with the arch shape cut out above to give a little extra headroom when boarding the helping tower.