Commercial Kitchen Exhaust Fan

Commercial Kitchen Exhaust Fan

Ventilation Rules of Thumb Commercial Kitchen Click on a hotspot to view products that relate to the image on the diagram. The illustration above shows a typical commercial kitchen application utilizing a roof mount upblast exhaust fan OR wall-mount upblast exhaust fan in conjunction with a supply fan. Note that not both exhaust fans are required for hood exhaust. Read on to determine how to size your exhaust and supply fans. For commercial kitchen applications, when not specified by code, the following guidelines may be used to determine the minimum kitchen hood exhaust CFM: Type of Cooking Equipment CFM/Ft.2 of Hood Light Duty Oven, Range, Kettle 50 Medium Duty Fryer, Griddle 75 Heavy Duty Charbroiler, Electric Broiler 100 Static pressure usually ranges from .625″ to 1.0″ for 1 story buildings. *NOTE – some local codes require 100 CFM/Ft.2 of hood area for wall style hoods. Supply air is recommended to be 90% of your determined exhaust CFM. The remaining 10% will be drawn from adjacent areas to the kitchen, which helps prevent undesirable odors from drifting into areas such as the dining room. For safety reasons, the NFPA (National Fire Protection Agency) has additional installation requirement for commercial kitchen applications. Use of Ventilated Roof Curb Use of Grease Collector Use of Clean-out Port Use of Hinge Kit Roof deck to top of exhaust fan windband – 40″ min. Roof deck to top of curb – 18″ min. Supply fan intake – 10′ min. from all exhaust fans. * For applications where the 10′ horizontal distance cannot be met, separation between exhaust and supply must be at least 3 feet.
commercial kitchen exhaust fan 1

Commercial Kitchen Exhaust Fan

Commercial Kitchen Click on a hotspot to view products that relate to the image on the diagram. The illustration above shows a typical commercial kitchen application utilizing a roof mount upblast exhaust fan OR wall-mount upblast exhaust fan in conjunction with a supply fan. Note that not both exhaust fans are required for hood exhaust. Read on to determine how to size your exhaust and supply fans. For commercial kitchen applications, when not specified by code, the following guidelines may be used to determine the minimum kitchen hood exhaust CFM: Type of Cooking Equipment CFM/Ft.2 of Hood Light Duty Oven, Range, Kettle 50 Medium Duty Fryer, Griddle 75 Heavy Duty Charbroiler, Electric Broiler 100 Static pressure usually ranges from .625″ to 1.0″ for 1 story buildings. *NOTE – some local codes require 100 CFM/Ft.2 of hood area for wall style hoods. Supply air is recommended to be 90% of your determined exhaust CFM. The remaining 10% will be drawn from adjacent areas to the kitchen, which helps prevent undesirable odors from drifting into areas such as the dining room. For safety reasons, the NFPA (National Fire Protection Agency) has additional installation requirement for commercial kitchen applications. Use of Ventilated Roof Curb Use of Grease Collector Use of Clean-out Port Use of Hinge Kit Roof deck to top of exhaust fan windband – 40″ min. Roof deck to top of curb – 18″ min. Supply fan intake – 10′ min. from all exhaust fans. * For applications where the 10′ horizontal distance cannot be met, separation between exhaust and supply must be at least 3 feet.
commercial kitchen exhaust fan 2

Commercial Kitchen Exhaust Fan

Restaurant Kitchen Hood Systems The purpose of any restaurant kitchen ventilation system to extract heat, grease and other vapors that are generated within a kitchen to keep the kitchen running safely and efficiently. At HoodFilters.com we supply all of the necessary components to build the restaurant ventilation system, from hoods to fans that you need to ensure your kitchen runs smoothly and within local codes. A kitchen hood system is made up of a few key components to ensure proper airflow is circulated through the kitchen to capture the smoke, steam, heat, grease and other food related vapors into the system. The heart of any restaurant kitchen ventilation system is the exhaust or vent fan, at HoodFilters.com we offer a wide selection of upblast exhaust fans designed to pull all of the heat, grease and other kitchen related vapors into the system’s ductwork and vertically away from the building. A kitchen vent hood is placed over the heating element in your restaurant to collect all of the heat and grease immediately from the source. Baffle filters are placed within your restaurant vent hood to filter as much of the grease as possible to prevent it from entering your ventilation system’s ductwork. The type of stove, oven or grill you are operating within your kitchen will determine what type of baffle filter is necessary to ensure safe and efficient operation of your restaurant kitchen ventilation system. The remaining smoke, heat and grease that makes its way past the baffle filter and through the restaurant vent hood will enter into the ductwork of your system. Once it enters the ductwork it will make its way towards the kitchen vent fan and eventually out of the building. A restaurant hood/ventilation system can be made up of one vent hood and one exhaust fan, or multiple restaurant vent hoods and fans connected through a system of multiple ducts. The type of system you require will depend on the size of your kitchen, the number of heating elements you have and where they are located. It is important that your restaurant exhaust fan is installed with a hinged cover that has the ability to open from the top. In order to operate a safe and code compliant system, it is important to be able to clean the kitchen ventilation fan and ductwork from the top down to clear any residual grease that may collect in the ductwork system. This will keep the potential for fire hazards low and your kitchen’s building safe. It is recommended to install top of the line baffle filters to keep the grease residue to a minimum, but even with the best baffle filters some residue is inevitable and the system will need to be cleaned. A make-up air unit is another necessary component of any restaurant kitchen ventilation system. Along with the heat, grease and food related vapors, the exhaust fan is also suctioning air out of your restaurant kitchen that needs to be replaced. The make-up air unit brings in fresh, clean air to circulate through your kitchen and “make up” for the air that is being suctioned out by the fan. At HoodFilters.com quality assurance and customer service are our top priority. Our friendly and knowledgeable staff is ready and available to help you through the entire process of building a safe and efficient restaurant kitchen ventilation system. We are available by phone or live-chat to answer any questions you have and ensure that your restaurant ventilation system fulfills the specific requirements of your restaurant kitchen.
commercial kitchen exhaust fan 3

Commercial Kitchen Exhaust Fan

Please see an online article from Home Energy for some insight into using oversized commercial kitchen fans in a residence. Makeup Air To operate any fan safely, the air that is exhausted from the inside to the outside must be replaced. This is why the Uniform Mechanical Code (UMC) requires makeup air for commercial kitchens. Makeup air is air that is intentionally pushed or pulled into the building in an amount more or less equal to the amount of air that is exhausted by the kitchen fan. Makeup air prevents fuel spillage and backdrafting from vented combustion appliances, such as gas water heaters or fireplaces, within the restaurant. Another purpose of requiring makeup air is to ensure that the fan can actually exhaust at its rated capacity. If the fan isn’t running at its rated capacity, it does not maintain sufficient air velocity to trap the various emissions from the cooking surface. A building’s tightness and exhaust duct configuration will affect the amount of air that fans inside it can exhaust. The tighter the building, the greater the pressure the fan has to operate against and the less air the fan can move. The amount of air that a fan can move against any given pressure is called its fan curve. Get too low on this fan curve, and a 1,200 CFM fan might exhaust only 1,000 CFM.
commercial kitchen exhaust fan 4

Commercial Kitchen Exhaust Fan

Weather Hoods, Grills And Backdraft Dampers Even when fans are off, stack effects and wind loads may cause outside air to enter or inside air to exhaust through fan ducting. Check the flaps from time to time to make sure they are clean and working. The exterior exhaust flap or louvers should be clean and in good repair to maintain unobstructed airflow and reduce air infiltration. Most exhaust ducts are fitted with a single flap exhaust hood or triple louver aluminum or plastic exhaust grill. Use weather hoods that lie flat on the wall in driveways and other places where hood-type units could be damaged. Clean exhaust hoods of lint and nesting materials seasonally to ensure that the flap or louvers are not blocked or stuck open.High Capacity SystemsHigh capacity, industrial or oversized exhaust fans, and range-top barbecue fans can cause chimney backdraft. Backdrafting occurs when air is drawn down chimneys, bringing dangerous combustion exhaust gases into the house. Avoid this by selecting sealed combustion heating appliances. If you have appliances with chimneys in your house, and you wish to install high capacity exhaust fans, you will need a matching supply air fan to balance house pressures. Many ventilation contractors or salespeople are unaware of the effects of large exhaust fans on other house appliances. Make sure that your system is properly installed with supply air and that you have smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors to warn you if you have severe chimney back drafting.

Commercial Kitchen Exhaust Fan

Commercial Kitchen Exhaust Fan
Commercial Kitchen Exhaust Fan